Invisible Oranges – Karl Sanders Of Nile

Joseph Schafer of Invisible Oranges has interviewed Karl Sanders of Nile.

Here is an excerpt:

Crumbling obelisks. The gilded tombs of kings. Impersonal deities with the heads of animals and the oblique whims of young children. The crescent of Islam rolling over northern Africa like a slow but vivacious tidal wave. These are the images that Karl Sanders conjures in Nile. His images and sounds carry power and mystery, imbued to them by a cocktail of research and oriental fetishization. The greatest strength of his music is melodies and note intervals that his presumably Western audience are not accustomed to. It’s part of what makes Nile an excellent band. It’s also a bit academic.

The headiness of Sanders’s music betrays a kind of social dissonance when one meets him. Sanders is a very modern man; he speaks colloquially, loves jokes and expounds on pop culture with the aplomb of a college student who spends too much time on Twitter. To be blunt, tlaking with Sanders is fun, a quality that is not always present in his discography.

What Should Not Be Unearthed is fun, though. The latest album in Sanders’s repertoire, and his strongest in years, packs more mid-tempo mosh riffs and big shout-along choruses than any of his work in the past decade.

Sanders yacked with us about his new, more fun approach to music and cracked a few jokes.

To read the entire interview go here.




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